Tag: eye contact and expression

OCA People and Place – People Aware: Eye contact and expression/Review a portrait sequence

This exercise involves setting up a portrait session, and taking a sequence of portraits where the subject is looking directly into the camera, or away from it, and using judgement to determine which produces the better image. As with most of these exercises, I asked a member of the family to pose for me – I’m not sure someone that I didn’t know would have the patience. I used a simple set-up, with the camera on a tripod, and a cable release (so easier to talk to the subject and no need to constantly be looking through the viewfinder) and used the same focal length throughout. This set up also meant that I could ensure that roughly the same amount of space was occupied by the subject in each frame. I took these outside with a softbox to brighten the shadows (behind the camera to the right of the subject at about 45 degrees) and a reflector to the left of the subject to even up the lighting on the face. Again using an identical set-up throughout meant that the lighting would be consistent across all of the images. As I knew the subject it was easy to give a bit of direction where needed to make sure I produced a reasonably varied set of photographs in terms of where the gaze was and position of the head.

I did this exercise in conjunction with the next in the course material, which asks for a review of a portrait sequence. The number of asterisks against each image below indicates my rating. As requested in the course notes, I have rated each image as either not good (*), acceptable (**), good (***) and identified what I think is the single best shot (****). I should be upfront and state here that most of the poorer quality images (which were either not sharp enough or there was really obvious flaws such as the subject’s eyes being closed) didn’t make it past my editor. I also had to be selective in what I have posted since some of the differences in expression or pose were very marginal. The course notes suggest that at least 20 images are taken. I had a set of over 70 (I stopped at this as I thought I had exhausted the possible variations but, on reflection, I could have taken more face on with the head straight – and perhaps altered the positioning of the subject in the frame).

The checklist in the course notes is a useful guide for assessing portraits – I mainly concentrated on composition, angle of the head, and facial expression. I’d managed to control for some of the other criteria mentioned through my set-up (e.g. using a plain background so no distractions were behind the subject, making sure nothing else was in the frame so the whole series is simple, and the lighting balance was good due to the use of external light and a reflector as well as ambient light, and the lighting is consistent across the sequence). I took some notes throughout, and started off with some fairly standard portraits with the subject looking into the camera and then a number where the gaze was away to varying degrees (1 through to 7 below). The portraits where the subject is more side on to the camera (8 through to 14) are probably a less typical pose for a portrait. I thought these would be the better shots when I took them and took a fair number with subtle variations to gesture and pose but, after reviewing them, I don’t have enough of the subject’s head in the shot and they look a little awkward (for a further edit I would be inclined to crop so the white space to the right is not so prominent). However, I think these work better than the similar sequence where the other side of the subject’s side of the face is closest to the camera (19-22), perhaps because this position didn’t feel as natural to the subject, and there wasn’t actually much space on this side for her to look into. After reviewing the whole set I would say the better shot is probably where the subject is face on (16). It’s a fairly formal pose but the subject is at ease, with the head to a slight angle.

1. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.***
1. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.***
2. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
2. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
3. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
3. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
4. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
4. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
5. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
5. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
6. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
6. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
7. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
7. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
8. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
8. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
9. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
9. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
10. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
10. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
11. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
11. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
12. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
12. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
13. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
13. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
14. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
14. 85mm, 1/30 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
15. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
15. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
16. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.****
16. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.****
17. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
17. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
18. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
18. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
19. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
19. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
20. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
20. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.*
21. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
21. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
22. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**
22. 85mm, 1/20 second, f/4, ISO 100.**